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Cool Down and Work Through Anger Cheri J. Meiners, M.Ed.
Cool Down and Work Through Anger
Everyone gets angry, so it’s never too early for children to learn to recognize feelings of anger, express them, and build skills for coping with anger in helpful, appropriate ways. Children learn that it is okay to feel angry—but not okay to hurt anyone with actions or words. They discover concrete social skills for anger management: self-calming, thinking, getting help from a trusted person, talking and listening, apologizing, being patient, and viewing others positively. Reassuring and supportive, the book helps preschool and primary children see that when they cool down and work through anger, they can feel peaceful again.
Presented in a social story format, the book includes a special section for adults, with discussion questions, games, activities, and tips that reinforce improving social skills.
Part of Free Spirit’s popular Learning to Get Along series of social stories, Cool Down and Work Through Anger helps children learn to behave responsibly toward themselves and others as they develop the skills of anger management. For all homes, childcare settings, and primary classrooms as well as special education, including settings with children on the autism spectrum.

Reviews

Cool Down and Work Through Anger is highly recommended for kids ages 4–8 who have anger management issues or concerns.”—Midwest Book Review, Children’s Bookwatch: Reviewer’s Choice
Cool Down and Work Through Anger is an excellent book for helping children understand this unpleasant but normal emotion. The book gives very helpful strategies for helping children deal with anger.” —Marian Marion, Ph.D., professor, Early Childhood Education, Governors State University
“A delightful addition to the series. I particularly like the focus on what kids can do to handle their anger more constructively, rather than focusing on what not to do. . . . The cognitive-behavioral perspective is also quite helpful—that changing thoughts as well as behaviors can help with handling anger. . . . Will appeal to kids as well as those who work with them.” —James J. Crist, Ph.D., author of What to Do When You’re Scared and Worried and Mad